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Record: oai:ARNO:508780

AuthorJ. Büttikofer
TitleOn the collections of Birds, sent by the late A. T. Demery from the Sulymah River (W. Africa)
JournalNotes from the Leyden Museum
AbstractThe collecting work of our much lamented african naturalist, Mr. A. T. Demery, having been abruptly stopped last year by his unexpected death (N. L. M. 1891, p. 248), it will be of no little importance to publish a list of the species of birds, obtained during his sojourn on the banks of the Sulymah River, the more as Demery is the first and hitherto the only collector who explored this part of the vast country between Grand Cape Mount and the Isle of Sherbro. His chief station was Juring, a native town on the left bank of the Sulymah River, about 10 miles off the sea-coast. From Juring he made several excursions, especially higher up the river, which latter is practicable for row-boats and canoes much farther inland than most of the rivers in Liberia. The whole country between the Mahfa River (Grand Cape Mount) and Sherbro is rather flat and seems to have about the same aspect as the country round the Fisherman Lake. High forest, interrupted by savannahs, extensive reed-jungles and large swamps cover the alluvial plain, which is crossed by the Mannah- ¹), the Sulymah- and the Gallinas River, and, especially in its western or northern part, by an immense net of mangrove-skirted creeks, while, a few miles west from the Gallinas River, and not far inland from the coast, is situated the Palma Lake, covered, especially in its eastern part, with numerous islands, and forming a conveniant abode for swamp- and water-birds. As the oro- and hydrographical conditions of this territory are the same as in Liberia and there being no important difference in latitude, it is evident that their fauna will be principally the same. Amongst the few mammals sent by Demery from the Sulymah River, there was not one which had not been obtained in Liberia before and, with a few exceptions, the same is the case with the birds from that river, and even of these few exceptions it is by no means certain that they are really wanting in the ornis of Liberia.
The species, ten in number, which hitherto have not been found in Liberia, will be marked with an asterisk.
Document typearticle
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